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So, how long did it take you to get a first release? (pg. 4)
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mystik_luminate
after now producing for 10+ years, i can say that some of the best ways to learn about production are to have a partner or other people that you are actively producing with...especially if they are also working with other people and/or very actively... That way you can share technical knowledge and also feedback about existing tracks that are out there and inspiring you as well as how to approach re-producing the sounds that you hear with the best possible production quality...

Another easy way to make things quickly is to use loops for basic elements, or samples from other sound sources. I've found this can give things a different sound than I might produce naturally with synths or individual percussion programming, etc... and adds another dimension that fills out the sounds and production quality nicely.

Otherwise, i think the main essential ingredients are TIME and PASSION for the music...and the perseverance to continue through crappy song production until you are actually sounding good enough to believe you could be released!

Keep on going! It is there...just keep producing and it will come...
Rodri Santos
quote:
Originally posted by chick
Some of you guys say 2 years or even 1.

Would you share that secret recipe for learning that fast? I think that's almost impossible.. or you were releasing on extremly labels? :conf:


If you've spent 6 months on a track without too much skills yet can be the same as when a profesional producer releases a track that has only a week of work.
cryophonik
quote:
Originally posted by chick
Some of you guys say 2 years or even 1.

Would you share that secret recipe for learning that fast? I think that's almost impossible.. or you were releasing on extremly labels? :conf:


People who already have some formal music training or a good working knowledge of songwriting (e.g., from playing in bands) have a huge headstart when it comes to producing music.
Sinnica Hax
started on a more serious level at '94, took 12 years upon the first signing, and four more signings close after that, yet none of them were signed, i love digital labels, big names, small names, does not matter, some people dont know how to run things ;)
chick
quote:
Originally posted by cryophonik
People who already have some formal music training or a good working knowledge of songwriting (e.g., from playing in bands) have a huge headstart when it comes to producing music.


It's not that musical/melodic stuff what takes time (ok for some it does,but you can still produce minimal/techno). It is the sound. I don't understand how can you learn to produce pro sound so fast (in less than 5 or even 3 years). I guess some ppl are "sound geniuses"
Kenny Rogers
quote:
Originally posted by chick
or you were releasing on extremly labels? :conf:

this. making "releasable" edm is really not hard at all. making good edm on the other hand is very difficult.
JEO
quote:
Originally posted by chick
It's not that musical/melodic stuff what takes time (ok for some it does,but you can still produce minimal/techno). It is the sound. I don't understand how can you learn to produce pro sound so fast (in less than 5 or even 3 years). I guess some ppl are "sound geniuses"


Commitment. You can say you've been chasing your dream of "becoming a pro" for 7 years practising 2 hours a day. Some commit and practise for 6-7 hours a day and make it in 2 years.
derail
quote:
Originally posted by Rodri Santos
If you've spent 6 months on a track without too much skills yet can be the same as when a profesional producer releases a track that has only a week of work.


I disagree with this. Learning how to mix well, training your ears to be able to hear all the little details, takes a lot of dedicated practice. It's not a case of simply hammering away at an early production until it sounds "professional".

I have no experience with painting. Put a canvas in front of me and let me keep working on the one painting, an hour a day, for six months, and I'm not going to be able to shape it into something that looks like a Rembrandt. I'd need a good few years of correct practice and experience before I'm able to do that (though I don't know whether I actually have any desire to paint well, in which case I'd never be able to achieve that).
Rodri Santos
maybe i am not a well example since i played the piano with audiences of 2k+ people when i was 8 years and in some way i am musically gifted (although very very lazy and i'm sure if i put more effort i could make better music) also at a very early stage was very enthusiastic in listening the different music patterns of the song and how are they modified, even the note sequence followed etc... (what is better known as active listening i believe)

I made this far before i started producing so i knew musical theory and piano (piano roll lol so i knew half of the daw) this is my case but also the same for so many people.

Requires also not many effort just listen:

-Good music
-Bad music

Learn why good music is good music and bad is bad by listening carefully to every single detail, after 50th listenings of the track you can discover new hidden content

. With all the ideas you've learnt only by listening learn to develop them on a daw and that's it. If you can improve this ideas much better. Profit.

With painting is not the same as you need a skill, learning how to use a daw is quite easy , simple & intuitive features , while i find painting a lot more difficult (i am awful at painting) , i still think like you that a good painter should be one who has seen a lot of good paintings, noticed some hidden techniques and learnt to reproduce them.

But i feel you need several years to create a good painting while in 1-2 years you now all the basic-mid high features of your daw & vsts.

This is at my point of view, as i said i was very enthusiastic with music at a short age.
Matt Bukovski
It took me one year of making music to have my first release (this friday!!!) on Echelon Records, I think it's a great label ;)

Mad for Brad
Went into debt 20 000 buying equipment. Practiced 8 hours a day. I was serious and got results. I didn't around. Releases these days don't mean anything. It actually was a feat to get your name on a record pre digital label days. Digital labels , unless they are very established are pretty much the same as just posting your on soundcloud.
Aesthetic
Truth

quote:
Originally posted by Mad for Brad
Went into debt 20 000 buying equipment. Practiced 8 hours a day. I was serious and got results. I didn't around. Releases these days don't mean anything. It actually was a feat to get your name on a record pre digital label days. Digital labels , unless they are very established are pretty much the same as just posting your on soundcloud.
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