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Don't you just love texas
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DJ Cubano


Man I love sunsets here!
SID133
thats a nice pic

i love living in texas btw
greatest state
architect1803
quote:
Originally posted by SID133
thats a nice pic

i love living in texas btw
greatest state


Yo sid, the pic is fantastic and has a very unique contrast and beautiful sunset. But i cannot wait to move outta this boring in piece of state. I hate Texas with a passion in my very own heart. The laws here can suck my left nut (i got two years probation for flicking off a state trooper). The people in Texas (of course not counting my TXTA peeps) can also sit on my nuts, especially my fat ass neighbor, who's in Ford I will blow up with a pipe bomb next week because she's been bitchin about us not being loud and obnoxious like them, and having their 7 year old boy smoke weed with mama everyday! I hate Texas mainly because of everyone's god forbidden audacity to listen to nothing but country. You ask them if they know what Trance music is, they'll say "what's that, a kind of car?"

I am moving to NY next year, where I plan to finish my BA in architecture. Now c'mon, please tell me that in NY the trance scene is in insane. And not only is it because of the music that I wanna move to NY, or because of my degree, but because there is a MAJOR diverse culture in that state.

I dont mean to speak against any of you, but when you have a judge and a in police officer tell you in your face "we hate you because you are puertorican!", then that kinda tells you there's something wicked about this hole state. By the way I sued the outta that cop and won the case in December ($160000 settlement). Thanx to that in cop I was able to pay off some college, and buy a set of Tecknics 1210's with loads of trance vinyls...

PEACE?
c/p
:whip:

PS: If you were in my shoes, would you say the same?
Danny Ocean
texas can suck fkn my balls, and that goes for the rest of you mother******s in this fkn board



























































kiddin, i love dallas , and i love dallas girls
architect1803
quote:
Originally posted by Danny Ocean
texas can suck fkn my balls, and that goes for the rest of you mother******s in this fkn board : kiddin, i love dallas , and i love dallas girls


damn! well that was just a little more than i expected...LOL! The only thing I actually LOVE about Texas are the TA's here and some of my professors at UT. But the rest of the crowd.....well you alrady know.

PEACE?
c/p
Matthias
Great pic. I miss the sunset in California..especially when at the beach and the sun sets in the dead center of the ocean...and then an hour later when the light fades the sky and ocean are black to where you cant tell either apart. I cant wiat until I move out though. I like the TXTAs... but the scene here leaves much to be desired.
jtobe
oh man, no dance scene in colorado, but it's my absolute favorite place on earth. beautiful. though, i had to move back to texas because i spent my entire school year hiking and snowboarding.

silly me.
DaveSZ
Pros and Cons of Texas:

Pros

-Women in the cities are generally hot
-Most people are friendly
-My family is from Texas

Cons

-Law enforcement, judicial, and legislative systems are beyond corrupt with a great many officials on "the take" (being bribed).
-Country music
-Very polluted


quote:
Originally posted by architect1803
"we hate you because you are puertorican!",



I'll add one more to the cons list:

-An underlying racist and homophobic sentiment on the part of many in the suburbs and rural areas


That makes the cons list bigger than the pros list, sorry.

Texas.

Oh yeah, and if you want sunsets, go to Colorado, Arizona, or New Mexico....

Trust me.

:D
prolikewhoa
quote:
Originally posted by Danny Ocean
kiddin, i love dallas , and i love dallas girls


damn straight you do *flips her hair*

:p :thepirate
jtobe
colorado: 2
texas: -743

score!

DaveSZ
quote:
Originally posted by DaveSZ


-Law enforcement, judicial, and legislative systems are beyond corrupt with a great many officials on "the take" (being bribed).



Here's what I'm talking about.

I'll bet you most of the asbestos victims voted for the guys who screwed them too, and in doing so got what they deserved.

Im sorry to reiterate, but, Texas.

http://www.statesman.com/search/con...estos_edit.html



Winslow: Denying asbestos victims their chance to get justice
N. Alex Winslow, TEXAS WATCH


Saturday, April 16, 2005

Asbestos is a deadly product that leads to progressive, incurable diseases, including cancer and slow suffocation. An unknown number of Texans were knowingly exposed to poisonous asbestos by polluters who are now trying to escape accountability.

At the Texas Legislature, lawmakers are considering legislation that will further strip the legal rights of thousands of Texans suffering from devastating asbestos-related diseases.

Two years ago, lawmakers enacted radical changes to our legal system that make it extremely difficult for individuals afflicted with these deadly diseases to pursue justice. These changes addressed Texas' so-called asbestos litigation "crisis." At the time, the lead lobbyist for one of the most powerful insurance industry-backed groups said the group had accomplished all of its objectives.

However, buoyed by their success in carving out protections for themselves, these same special interests are back this session demanding even more. This time, they are trying to use the Legislature to wipe out existing claims. Simply put, they are threatening the separation of powers through legislation.

The 2003 law gave insurance companies a whole new bag of tricks to avoid responsibility. In fact, the number of asbestos filings in Texas has dropped dramatically in the last two years, prompting the general counsel for the primary group pushing the asbestos industry's proposals to say that "Texas is not an attractive place to try an asbestos case."

Buried deep in the asbestos legislation before lawmakers this year is a provision that would throw out the claims of thousands of asbestos victims who have been waiting for years for their day in court. Essentially, the bill is back-dated, retroactively changing the rules. This will create a legal logjam that could take years to sort out. Victims who have spent precious time and money will be sent to the back of the line and forced to start over. These delays benefit the polluters not the victims.

The insurance and asbestos companies also are introducing arbitrary medical criteria that would exclude even those who face a lifelong risk of cancer. To qualify for this standard, the average 60-year-old male would have to lose over a third of his lung function before being able to pursue a claim against the company that poisoned him.

Put another way, 95 percent of all Texans diagnosed with asbestos poisoning will never be able to hold a wrongdoer accountable.

Finally, there is a glaring omission in the legislation. The polluters are not required to guarantee that resources will be available for those few Texans who are sick enough to be granted access to our courts.

Many companies are hiding behind federal bankruptcy statutes that allow them to avoid accountability, and many others are maneuvering their assets to escape responsibility. If victims have to wait until they are near death before being allowed to hold these wrongdoers accountable, then the polluters should be required to have resources earmarked for these claims. Anything less is an empty promise.

Proponents of this legislation claim that their concern is for the truly sick. Let's be clear: this is not about helping those who have been harmed by polluters who manufacture and use poisonous asbestos. The real goal is to shield those companies and their insurers from accountability. These companies knowingly poisoned hard-working Texans for years, and now they want to be let off the hook.

Our lawmakers should not aid the polluters and insurance companies that have put our neighbors and communities at risk. Those men and women who are suffering from asbestos diseases deserve real reforms that strengthen protections not more excuses and stall tactics that will deny justice for thousands.

Winslow is executive director of Texas Watch, a consumer advocacy and research group.
DaveSZ
quote:
Originally posted by jtobe
colorado: 2
texas: -743

score!



Did you count my vote for Colorado?

:p
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